In the PlayStation 4 exclusive Days Gone, a sub-romance in the story is between the main character, Deacon, and his epic motorcycle. As we mentioned in our review, the bike was a key part of fully immersing one's self into the open-world zombie adventure, but one thing that can get some players in trouble is forgetting to refuel. That's where we come in handy. 

Days Gone offers a massive open-world, one in which has fuel cans hidden away everywhere. The easiest way to nab one is to head to the more populated areas, areas that you'll have to go to anyway for the various fetch quests in-game. Once a fuel can has been spotted, interact with it to equip it and then head over to that beloved bike. Once close enough, a prompt will pop up asking the player to top off their fuel. Follow the prompt's instructions, which is pressing the Circle option on the controller, and then you're good to go. 

Finding these cans can be a bit tricky, which makes the alternative to happening upon them a little more beneficial. If you're having problems finding a can, there are places on the map that offer gas pumps and mechanics. The easiest one to access is the O'Leary Mountain Safehouse, which is unlocked near the beginning of the adventure. Once these areas are unlocked, players can reference them at any time by locating the gas pump icon on the map and head to the nearest fast travel location. 

Days Gone is available exclusively on the PlayStation 4 on April 26th. To learn more about what our opinion on the game was, you can read our full review here with a small excerpt below: 

"Overall, Days Gone felt alright. It wasn't great, it wasn't even good at times, but was saved by select charm found in Deacon as a character, the bike mechanics that offered total immersion in the open-world, and the few moments within the story that offered something of value outside of the traditional zombie trope. 

It's a decent game, one worth trying out and one that hides a few secrets for those willing to find them, but it seemed to be shipped in pre-pubescent stage, never truly reaching its fully-grown potential. "